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Testimonials

Jo Meek – Great Britain
[…] What a race! I thought perhaps it was too hard, too technical but with 12hrs separating me from the race I reflect if that’s what you enjoy and you are good at the technical stuff then it’s well worth entering. The Bucegi Mountain range does not disappoint at all…READ MORE

Henrik Modin – Sweden
[…] The tears rolled, as I told her about arms in the air, laughing, cheering, hugging and screaming. The tears today came out of pure joy. Man, I wish there was a camera attached to the wall. It was one of the most intense moments I’ve experienced as a runner. READ MORE

Viktor Winterglöd – Sweden (translated from Swedish)
Trail Dracula, a competition so sneaky, so seductive, so marrow-sucking, so scary, so wonderful that it takes your whole body and mind occupied. Gives you hope and faith, dispels all your strength with the power of the wind, throw yourself down, drag you up, let themselves be appeased, tickles your ego and relegates it with twilight cruise down the fatigue mill[…]Countdown:10 – double knotted shoelaces – 9 – soon so – 8 – what I have again gotten myself into? – 7 – I love this feeling – 6 – Friday morning and back home in Sweden living, people wake up to the nursery remains and job meetings – 5 – I own ability – 4 – is strong enough to explore the exciting nature – 3 – morning coolness and warmth of bodies in the starting gate -2 – sets the clock in motion – 1 – freedom! The clock strikes 06:00 and the bubble of…READ MORE

Luc Hapers – Belgium
I wouldn’t be surprised if this one ‘s gonna be the hardest one of all! Not distance wise but technically! No wonder you get awarded 4(5new) UTMB points for it. Nearly 30 hours for just over 100km says enough I think…READ MORE

Anne-Marie Flammersfeld – Switzerland
It`s not easy to find the right words for that race. It was rough, hard, even extremer than I expected. Running besides bears, barking shepherd dogs and wolves it`s very challenging. The mountains of Bucegi are very beautiful and the home of Dracula is a very special place. I haven`t seen him. Maybe he was around in those very dark forests. Glad my mind was doing other things for example counting the altitude and thinking about to give up. I have had never ever such thoughts in race before. With all these Up`s and Down`s in my mind and with all these Up`s and Down`s on the track I can say it was really a great race. [….] Suddenly Jo starts screaming and shouting. I wonder why because I havn`t heard anything until my ears recognize that sound of a puffing bear. We start walking a bit faster and start talking to the bears we can`t see but which are around us. [….]
It`s only and always You versus You.
..READ MORE

Laila Ojefelt – Sweden (part1) (translated from Swedish)
Large heavy drops fall down on us. Raincoat or not? The ravine is more like the Amazon than the mountains of Carpathians. The undergrowth is dense, the trees are tight, there are logs and rocks back and forth as we get cross and climb over and the ground is anything but plain. I think to myself that they must be joking with us. Should it be here in 106 km now? A psychological very difficult start...READ MORE

Andreas Claesson – Norway
They said it was the toughest race in Romania. I would extend that to Europe. Maybe the world. [….] Romania – The largest population of bears in Europe, and where Dracula turned out to be the nice guy…READ MORE

Henrik Modin – Sweden
[….]Even though my day didn’t turn out the way I expected it to, it was one of my best experiences ever, full of pain, joy, happiness and some more pain. I’ve learned so much – about myself, my weaknesses, strengths, race-strategy and companionship. Sadly, my engine stopped and the wheels came off as early as the second ascent to Omu peak but I managed to endure to the start-area. Not alone, and not on my own. The organizers and volunteers were amazing and made everything to help me out. But there were three runners that gave me support, company and strength as the day turned into night and my legs stiffened…READ MORE

Johan Enell – Sweden (translated from Swedish)
The last hundred meters of altitude is tough, but the feeling of being on top is wonderful. What a view.[…]I had forgotten that I was thinking of breaking and he gave me no opportunity to remember it either. Joy![…]
“Races are communal, the competitive urge’m staying close to the camaraderie of a shared experience. In the off-road racing, this is always the…READ MORE

Bogdan Bojă (Bubulu) – Romania
[….]eram conştient că în faţă aveam cel mai dur traseu de ultra din România[….]Urmează coborârea pe Cerb – Andrei este în faţă cu Jo, iar eu cu Anne Marie puţin mai în spate…Îi dau la vale pe scurtături, în speranţa că terenul o să mă ajute. Din păcate Anne Marie se dovedeşte un coborâtor foarte bun, eram mult în afara potecii, fix pe fir, pe zone unde cam trebuia să ştii să descaţeri, unde un alergător de IOR ar fi avut mari probleme…Anne Marie este Draculea în varianta feminină...îmi suflă în ceafă, iar când intrăm din nou în potecă trece de mine…READ MORE

Floricica Neacşu – Romania
[…]Mi-am dat seama ca nu trebuie doar sa visezi, sa-ti doresti sa alergi, daca vrei sa participi la o competitie trebuie sa fii pregatit fizic( pe faleza e fain sa alergi, dar e total diferit de munte), sa fii foarte atent la traseu( eu sunt o zapacita si ma cam ratacesc, ceea ce s-a intamplat si aici, ratacire care m-a costat ore bune), sa cunosti foarte bine regulamentul si bineinteles sa stii ce vrei, sa continui cursa…READ MORE

Laila Ojefelt – Sweden (part2) (translated from Swedish)
It’s nothing I tell myself! Not on this course. Here, anything can happen. Nothing is impossible. Well? I have an incredibly great respect for that fifth place from the Comrades, but this is Transylvania ..The chase is on. […]
The stress is there no longer. It’s me and my body that strives upward. In harmony. In rhythm. This is where I thrive best. I’m looking curiously around me. Again, I am in a fine old forest. Straight tall trees stretching to the sky. The path is remarkable. It seems to divide, merge, disappear. It really is like witch’s forest. [….]Omu Peak gives me new energy. New hope. Once the slope releases her grip on my legs and flattens out, I look out over the mountains and dusk. I look up and smile to myself. Yep yep. Life is amazing. Big and beautiful. Here I am. At the top of the fabled Mountains of Transylvania. A stone’s throw from Dracula’s Castle. I’m in the middle of a dream in the fairy marvelous world. What else can I wish for? Lord? Thank you! Thanks for letting me live! Thanks for letting me be here tonight! And thanks for the slope being over…READ MORE

Laila Ojefelt – Sweden (part3) (translated from Swedish)
[…]It feels like I have someone or something behind me. A few times I had to turn around and look. And finally, I understand what it is. It’s the moon! It’s not many days to be full and it shines. Strong. When there are no other lights and no reflection from the cities and communities the starry sky become  so much more magical. But I have no time to either enjoy or shudder…READ MORE

Cristoffer Stockman – Sweden (translated from Swedish)
[…]the long, long uphill. The one I must prior belief to be the hardest hill. I do some calculations to myself that maybe I might have time to pick me up from the forest of light and do not need to use the headlamp before the top...READ MORE

Laila Ojefelt – Sweden (pre-race) (translated from Swedish)
[…]I ran and wondered whether it was long or short tights in effect on the day of the race. Down in the valley, it was warm and pleasant. Once we got up at Omu Peak blew a chilly breeze and I was quickly cooled…READ MORE

Laila Ojefelt – Sweden (post-race) (translated from Swedish)
Free from the Earth’s requirements. Back on the mountain. In the woods. In the dark. In the solitude. Life was no more complicated or greater than that which was held in the headlamp light…READ MORE

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